billy

Sometimes you win & sometimes you learn

Shots on Goal

brycedotvc:

I’m not a hockey fan. I can count the number of hockey games I’ve ever watched on one hand.

But last night, I turned on my TV and the channel was set to the Kings/Rangers game. It was the 3rd period and the Rangers we leading 2-1.

Soon a stat popped up on the screen and I knew, despite the…

Great post. Should’ve been the Hawks…

A box is a house for a teabag.
A teapot’s a house for some tea.
If you pour me a cup and I drink it all up,
Then the teahouse will turn into me!

Cartons are houses for crackers.
Castles are houses for kings.
The more that I think about houses,
The more things are houses for things.

A house is a house by Mary Ann Hoberman

uzowuru:


My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 


Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

uzowuru:

My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 

Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

(Source: it-used-to-be-fun)

Don’t let us forget that the causes of human actions are usually immeasurably more complex and varied than our subsequent explanations of them.

—Dostoyevsky, Fyodor. The Idiot.

(Source: wordsnquotes, via wordsnquotes)

Saw a show about earthships years ago but could never find out more information on how they were structured until now. When I see innovative architectural structures like the above, I always wonder how they would hold up in New Orleans. From the humidity to the foundation, could something like this exist in NOLA?

Via architizer

PROCESS OVER EVERYTHING

During my first year as a VFA fellow I found myself in a number of roles. It was great to get to try out so many different positions and it enabled me to become more familiar with our team, product, and overall value proposition. It also illuminated the company’s trajectory and gave me a vantage from which I identified a number of inefficiencies, particularly in the way we approached product development.

We were using a common toolbox - email, skype, github - but there was no discipline in how we used these tools. Workflows weren’t defined anywhere and there was little sense of what work lay ahead. It was a constant whirlwind of information being asked for from one platform, delivered to another, discussed elsewhere and without a clearly defined outcome we often lost track of crucial components and tasks. 

In an effort to organize our team, I reached out to Pete Bodenheimer of flatstack to see if he would share his team’s methodology. He took me through their Trello boards and their daily scrums in Basecamp. As a noob to project management I was blown away by their ability to track progress, follow consistent  workflows, and lay out future sprints. I suggested using these tools to my company’s team but our lead developer’s response was something along the lines of, “go fuck yourself…”

"I don’t want to use another damn platform!" he said, so we trudged through another couple months of uncoordinated development only to have a critical feature that worked previously crap out in the middle of a high-profile demo. Boss man was not happy, to say the least, and he gave me the go-ahead to implement a new process.

After creating accounts for the tools Pete had shown me, I began setting up the boards. Then it occurred to me, I was shooting myself in the foot. Why would I implement a tool that our most technical team member is opposed to? He would resent me and inevitably fall out of habit, writing his updates elsewhere(if at all), leaving me with an even more unorganized mess to clean up down the line.

I went back to Pete and explained to him my dilemma. “The tool isn’t as important as the process,” he said, “figure out a way to make what you are already using work.” 

So I did. I hacked together github to act not only as an issue tracker and code repo but also to outline and assign workflows, act as a space for daily reports and responsibility, and also to organize new and backlogged stories into future sprints.

While it’s not a perfect system, and it has its limitations, it is most certainly an improvement. We are working faster, having less unnecessary conversations, and other areas for improvement are becoming clearer. 

make it worth hanging

via core77.com

The Qualified Self: Going Beyond Quantification

I was a fan. A buyer of multiple bands for friends and family, with a network to motivate. A las, my fascination with fitbit has flailed. Context is everything and the type of knowledge I’m seeking has not developed because of a great depth of data. Quantified understanding requires an ability to skim from the top and separate qualitatively. I am still stepping, but I am looking for the direction to go.

Rule #105: Offend your targets sensibilities
fastcompany:

"The idea was based on an observation—we noticed that despite feeling for the homeless we only occasionally stopped to give money," says Bird. "That awful feeling after you’ve walked past either someone collecting for charity or a homeless person—it felt like something we could work with. We all know what the right thing to do is, but how often do we actually do it?"
Watch>

Rule #105: Offend your targets sensibilities

fastcompany:

"The idea was based on an observation—we noticed that despite feeling for the homeless we only occasionally stopped to give money," says Bird. "That awful feeling after you’ve walked past either someone collecting for charity or a homeless person—it felt like something we could work with. We all know what the right thing to do is, but how often do we actually do it?"

Watch>